The College Majors that do the Best in the Real World

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Right now in the United States, about 40% of working-age adults have a college degree, be it a Bachelors or Associates. To put this into perspective, in 1950, that number was about 6%, and as recently as 1980, just 16%.

That’s a lot of education walking around.

Here’s another fun fact: right now in the United States, about 8.3% of working-age adults are unemployed— compared to an incredibly low 2.5% in 1950 and 6% in 1980.

Now I know I’m throwing a lot of numbers at you, but I am trying to illustrate a point: Despite the increased number of college graduates these days, in a tough economy, even many of the most educated people remain unemployed.

As of late, this topic of higher education has been on many peoples’ minds. There are articles claiming less people should go to college; others that state just the opposite. People argue employers should be more exclusive; others counter that they should be less so. Even President Obama has given his two cents stating, “ In this economy, a high school diploma no longer guarantees a good job.”

But these days, a college diploma doesn’t even seem to guarantee a good job, or a job at all. So what can we do? Well, for one thing, we can toss that old idea of “it doesn’t matter what type of degree you get, as long as you get a degree” right out the window. Because these days, more than ever, the type of degree you get does matter. And it may well mean your employment—or not.

So check out this infographic. We’ve listed not only the most profitable majors (which can be very profitable!), but also the ones that are most likely to get you a job straight out of school.

Now these aren’t necessarily the most popular majors (FYI: Business Administration is the most popular major), but they are the ones that will make the most, and/or actually earn you a job.

And isn’t that what we’re after?

[Click on image to enlarge]

Comment below and let us know what you think: Does choosing one major over another better ensure your chance for a job or money?


Sources: SSDan.net, QuickAnded.com, BLS.gov, DailyMarkets.com, Time.com, WSJ.com

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